Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall Into Better Health Find A Great Smile

Fall into good dental health

The end of summer signals a number of challenges for families trying to keep teeth and gums healthy.  Kids and young adults return to school, and adjust to busy, changing schedules. Parents work to reestablish systems that ensure all the homework, sports, attendance and class stuff, not to mention hygiene, get accomplished.

Its easy to let the daily brushing habits get a little loose. Add to that special days that pet even more pressure on the health of everyones mouth. Did you know that besides those last holiday weekends and campouts August boast other memorable days that celebrate…or challenge a healthy mouth:

  • August 6th is Friendship Day, nothing says “friend” like having a warm and healthy happy smile.
  • Simultaneously August 6th is also National Fresh Breath Day.
  • Nothing says celebrate your strong teeth (by brushing after celebrating) National S’mores Day on August 10th.
  • Nothing says fall is coming like the end of August. August 25th decries brushing and oral health like National Kiss and Make Up Day.

Smiling is the universal signal of good intentions and a trustworthy intention. Smiling makes you feel better, releases endorphins, and helps you live a longer life by focusing of being happy.  People smile because it is a normal reaction to positive feelings, and expression of joy, and because the more you smile the more endorphins your body makes.

A few more benefits to encourage maintaining your oral hygiene routine, even when your schedule is hectic;

  • Add 7 years to your life. Smiling has such a good impact on your overall mental and physical well being that it literally adds years to your life.
  • No Pain, for more gain. Smiling reduces the effects of pain and aggression, raising pain threshold so that you can do more burpees.
  • Skies the limit, studies find that on average smilers are more content and at the same time, more successful.
  • Immune Booster, Smiling boosts HGH production and, among other things, reduces chance of cancer.

The average adult smiles 20 times in a day, happy people smile 45 times a day, but children smile as often as 400 times a day. Get smiling and remember to brush and floss everyday to keep that smile tip-top.

Early First Check-ups Keep Teeth Healthiest

Early First Check-ups Keep Teeth Healthiest

Never too early for a first check-up

  • The First Year is the ideal time for the initial check-up visit with your child’s dentist.
  • By twelve months old your child can have as few as one or two teeth or as many as twelve teeth.
    • regardless of the number of teeth, making the dentist a familiar, friendly place ensures a better visit for you and baby.
    • Between two and three years of age kids get their full set of baby teeth complete with molars.
      • Molars appear last and the front middle teeth usually emerging first.

Often the exact moment a child’s first dental visit is recommended can seem arbitrary. Some recommendations call for a dental visit at age one. Some recommend as soon as teeth first appear. With such a wide range it may be hard to decide how urgent that first dental check up should be.

First Impressions and a Positive Experience

A good rule of thumb is to start regular check-ups with the dentist early. Start visits after the first tooth has erupted, or by the age of one.

  • Very young children become accustomed to visiting various places and can quickly build a positive impression of the dentist office when they have several quick, easy and positive visits.
  • Learning to sit in the dental chair, open up and say, “ah” and having fingers and tools in their mouth can seem strange for a little one.
  • A small child with a few positive past experiences will be much more inclined to trust the dentist if and when a bigger issue should arise.

Quick and Invaluable

A first visit to the dentist can be a very brief visit or last up to thirty minutes. The dentist will check bite alignment, teeth, and soft tissues. Since decay can start as soon as teeth erupt, the dentist will also thoroughly check teeth for signs of decay, and go over at home care with you and your child, and if indicated they may perform a gentle cleaning to remove plaque, tartar, any stains and quickly polish teeth.

Questions and History

If you have any questions or concerns there will be time to discuss these things as well. Questions you have may range from fluoride use, number of times and length of time to brush, appropriate tooth brushes, or discussing previous bumps and tumbles that may leave teeth chipped or injured, mentioning those events can help your dentist evaluate potential future issues.

Best Times To Set Up Appointments

  • Earlier in the day many children will have a much higher tolerance for new experiences and new people.
  • A goodnights rest, and a healthy breakfast, will set the stage for successful dental visit and exam.
  • Bringing a favorite toy, book, or blanket can also be helpful in building confidence while visiting a new place like the dentist office.

Finally

First time dental check-ups are ice-breakers. They set young children up for positive experiences when visiting the dentist in the future. Being extra patient and calm go a long way in sending the message that there is nothing to be worried about or afraid of. Talk to your little one in the days leading up to your appointment. Telling small children how dentists help keep our teeth healthy and strong also relays a comforting, reassuring message.

If your child is already older than one and has not yet been to a dentist or more than six months have passed, this is a good review, now is the perfect time to get that appointment booked.

Metal Allergy and Dental Health

Metal Allergy and Dental Health

Metal dental implants were originally made out of commercially pure titanium or titanium alloy, providing the only option for implant tooth restoration for many years. After years of study, we now know that placing metallic dental implants and other restorative devices can potentially provoke allergic reactions. One study involving 1,500 patients demonstrated that although rare, titanium allergy could be clearly detected in dental implant patients. One research paper published in 2010 indicated that “…the risk of an allergy to titanium is increased in patients who are allergic to other metals. In these patients, an evaluation of allergy is recommended, in order to exclude any problem with titanium medical devices.” Further research on the subject noted a higher risk of positive allergic reaction was found in patients whose implants failed for no other known reason other than that they had a higher incidence of allergic reaction.

Who cares about allergies?

Metal allergies are suspected by researchers and holistic dentists alike of being one of the most likely culprits behind the growing number of cases of autoimmune diseases in the United States including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Psoriasis, and Scleroderma, Lupus, Rheumatoid arthritis, type I diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, and many others. A correlation between metal allergies and a weakened immune system suggests that it is not only important but imperative to take the necessary precautions to ensure that patients are biocompatible before allowing any substance or material to be permanently affixed into the mouth.

There’s more to titanium than you might think

Screw and abutments used in dental implants can be made from the same alloy, but frequently a combination of alloys are used including small amounts of nickel and gold. One of the more commonly reported metal allergies in dental patients is to nickel, which explains why anyone with known sensitivities to metals would be vulnerable to the side effects of titanium implants. Symptoms to metal implants can vary from patient to patient and often include oral burning sensation, general fatigue, skin rashes, a constant dull pain and in some cases loss of the implant. A paper published in July of 2011 focused on titanium allergy in patients who have undergone an implant, and it concluded in part; “This review of the literature indicates that titanium can induce hypersensitivity in susceptible patients and could play a critical role in implant failure.”

Titanium allergy is rarely documented in mainstream medicine however, it has been reported that about four percent of all patients tested will be allergic to titanium. For those affected with a titanium allergy, the symptoms can be quite intense and somewhat confusing ranging from simple skin rashes to deep muscle pain and overall fatigue – common systems for an immune system that perceives itself under attack.

The known effects of titanium allergy

Like all metals used in the medical field today titanium releases tiny particles as it begins to corrode. In the case of an implant, these metal particles become ions and bind to proteins found naturally throughout the body. In some people the body reacts to metal particles in the same way it does to a virus or other foreign substance and it will try to attack the ‘invader’. This starts a chain reaction which can lead to many symptoms including Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

Allergy Testing – An Important Part of the Whole

Our unique focus on dental health takes into consideration a patient’s oral health in relation to the whole body, including identifying and treating issues pertaining to allergies and autoimmune disorders.

That is why we consider ceramic dental implants to be the better and safest alternative to metal implants. The advantage of these implants is that they are ceramic, and thus there is no concern of corrosion, allergic reaction or electronic interference.

Yes to Dental Implants

Yes to Dental Implants

Permission to invest in you and your smile — Say yes to dental implants today

Not so simple as a nod to vanity, a healthy mouth and teeth keep you healthy. Dental Implants; more than artificial teeth.

  • They are permanently implanted into the gum tissue and jawbone.
  • The best replacement systems are made entirely of ceramic.
  • They are as strong and beautiful as real teeth.
  • Your bones and soft tissues can’t tell the difference.
  • There is never a risk of reactions or rejection.
  • Implants can replace one or many missing teeth.

What happens in the process of getting an implant

Getting an implant is easy as long as you have a qualified dentist. However in the age of instant gratification, implants disappoint.

4 – STEP PROCESS

  1. Your dentist will determine if jawbone bone density meets requirements.
    • Inadequate bone can be complicated:
      • when a long time has passed between the loss of the original tooth
      • if injuries or infection were a factor in loss,
      • bone density may need to be increased prior to surgery.
  2. Initially a post or “root” is surgically inserted into the socket of the jawbone.
  3. Eventually fusion of the “root” with the jawbone occurs.
  4. A bite impression is made and a crown designed to match surrounding teeth.
  5. The crown gets fixed to the ceramic post or “root” for a permanent tooth replacement.

 

Choose ceramic dental implants

  • Implants look like natural teeth
  • They will never tattoo gum lines
  •  Will last a lifetime
  • Strong, permanent teeth mean no food restrictions
  • Bio-inert ceramic implants will not leach into the body over time
  • No slipping as with dentures
  • Implants preserve surrounding teeth
  • Improvement in jawbone density keeps faces from collapsing with age
  • Smiling more means better health

Good things come to those who can wait. From start to finish, getting implants can take as little as several months or more than a year. Implants are worth the wait.

Straight the Gate to a Perfect Smile

Straight the Gate to a Perfect Smile

A Straight, Great Smile For Your Health

A fantastic smile reaps dividends. First impressions are weighted by a bright and confident smile, things like trust and appreciation are a little more effortlessly gained just by sharing a confident smile. Conversely, confidence is easier to cultivate when we are well received, both points making a good argument for taking good care of your smile. Less often considered are the number of other health benefits that come from having straight teeth.

Keep Them Straight to Keep Them Clean

  • Perfectly aligned teeth stay cleaner.
  • Clean teeth smell better, a benefit of nicely aligned teeth, less places for smelly bacteria to hideout.
  • Malocclusions (teeth that are misaligned) tend to create crowded spaces that are more difficult to clean making removal of plaque or tarter unsuccessful.
  • Current scientific evidence has conclusively established a link between gum diseases–caused by plaque and tartar deposits–and other, more serious health maladies.
  • Definitive studies demonstrate there are links between health issues like heart disease, diabetes, even birth defects and gum disease.

Missing Teeth Undo a Great and Healthy Smile

When teeth are missing due to loss or defect the remaining teeth can become unstable and begin to move around in the mouth. Moving teeth can become crowded and develop malocclusions leading to other problems besides increasing bacterial deposits.

  • Misaligned–or malocclusions–elevate a tooths risks of fracturing and breaking.
  • Even seemingly minor malocclusions can lead to defects like cracks in enamel.
  • Broken teeth are cause for immediate dental attention.
  • Cracks and fissures may not be immediately evident.
  • Over time those small breaches in the enamel can significantly weaken teeth, making them more likely to break or shatter later.
  • Cracks can make teeth more susceptible to sensitivity as well.

Ceramic, Permanent Implants; Best Option

Overtime, improper alignment of teeth can lead to other problems. Excess wear and teeth moving into open spaces created by tooth loss may inevitably lead to additional loss. Healthy bone and soft tissue growth will diminish and increase the likelihood of further loss. For this reason and others get missing teeth restored with an implant.

It’s never too late to get a better smile. Call our office to schedule a consult today.

Eight more reasons you should follow up on getting that smile you deserve

  1. Straight teeth give you healthier gums – When teeth are too widely spaced or crowded, they often become inflamed and red. These characteristics not only look bad, they’re a sign of periodontal disease.
  2. Straightening your teeth helps the gums fit more securely around the teeth, creating the strongest defense against periodontal problems.
  3. Makes teeth easier to clean – Crowded teeth are much more difficult to floss, which can lead to plaque buildup and eventually tooth decay. The inability to remove all the food caught in the brackets and wires of metal braces can also lead to a similar outcome.
  4. Prevents abnormal tooth wear – Crowded bottom teeth often cause one or more teeth to jut out, which rub against the upper teeth. Over time, this leads to an inefficient chewing function and can cause undue wear to tooth enamel.
  5. Decreases your risk of tooth injury – Crowded, protruding upper teeth are more likely to be broken in the event of an accident.
  6. Decreases headaches or neck pain – Crooked teeth place excessive stress on the gums and the bone that supports the teeth. This can also be a sign of a jaw misalignment, which can lead to chronic headaches as well as face or neck pain.
  7. Improves self-esteem and happiness – An important component of your overall health is your mental health. Numerous studies have shown that having a better looking smile increases the amount you smile, which in turn leads to various health benefits, including lower stress and improved cognition.
  8. Improves overall health – The tooth decay and gum disease associated with crooked teeth are caused by decay. Left untreated, this bacteria can lead to mouth sores, bleeding gums and possible tooth loss.

 

 

Smile Like You Mean It, Bridges -vs- Implants

Smile Like You Mean It, Bridges -vs- Implants

For some of us, having a perfect smile seems like a far away dream

If you have ever had a missing tooth–one or more–consider yourself a candidate for implants. Even if you are missing multiple teeth, implants can support a crown or bridge replacing those teeth. Implants function as normal teeth without concern for decay. If all or most of the teeth are missing, implants may be placed to fix a permanent, in place, full-mouth fixture or denture.

Often the process of getting a dental restoration seems overwhelming, read on to get answers to important concerns.

How to get a bridge -vs- how to get an implant

Bridge: Conventional Dental Bridge Placement requires modifying adjacent tooth

Getting fitted for a denture bridge requires the manual modification of the teeth on either side the bridge. This process significantly weakens adjacent teeth. In order to fit a conventional bridge the structure of the existing teeth has to be ground down to support the false bridge. This practice weakens adjacent teeth.

Dental implants do not affect the health or longevity of neighboring teeth at all, in fact implants support the health of surrounding teeth. Once established, implants are firmly set into the bone making them more natural than dentures or conventional bridges, with none of the shifting that dentures normally display.

Some problems with conventional bridges

• Since they are bonded to the adjacent tooth with a glue-like substance, bridges more often become loose and fall out

• Cracks and fissures form over time, due to normal wear and tear, causing them to become fragile and prone to breakage

• Surrounding soft tissue, and often bone, recedes leaving less support to adjacent teeth

• Improper fit can lead to either tooth decay or irritation to the surrounding sensitive tissue in the mouth

No such problems with implants

Ceramic dental implants are recommended to patients because:

Permanent solutions for your dental restoration
• Chewing is easy with excellent biting pressure provided by implant

• Dental Implants have a good reputation for providing reliable and long-standing service, providing decades of use with few, if any complications

• Comfortable fit and durability because they are well secured and integrated with the bone and gums

• Dental Implants look as natural as real teeth, support the health of surrounding teeth and don’t adversely effect other physiological systems.

Considering the overall advantages patients can expect to benefit from as a result of choosing a dental implant, they are better able to enjoy a healthier lifestyle without the restrictions many denture wearers face. Ultimately, not worrying about dentures becoming loose or falling out when speaking or eating offers a freedom that simply makes sense. The more secure foundation offered by a dental implant improves biting pressure, making it possible to enjoy the foods that a patient probably would not be able to using a dental prosthetic. With improved chewing ability it is more likely for a person to have a better diet and therefore improved overall healthfulness.

Contact our office to come in and discuss your restoration options today.

Marilyn K Jones DDS

Address: 800 Bering Dr Suite 204 , Houston, TX 77057
Phone: (713) 785-7767
Email: mjones@hal-pc.org

Eat Right–Keep Your Teeth White

Eat Right–Keep Your Teeth White

Eat right, keep your teeth white–Prevent stains and discolored teeth

It’s natural to want to look good. A bright smile is certainly part of that picture. Unfortunately many social gatherings present a staggering number of food and drink options that are contrary to maintaining a white smile. Learn these tips for white teeth, despite your social engagements.

Stop discoloring and staining. Load your arsenal now with a bag of tricks to help compensate. Choose carefully and you may stop or even prevent stains. In some cases you can reverse staining from indulgent social gatherings.

Know your foe

Understanding the most likely culprits at risk for causing staining to tooth enamel helps you make an informed decision on foods to avoid. You can bet that a food that stains carpeting or clothing will also stain porous enamel. Acidic foods, tomatoes for example, make enamel softer. Soft enamel stains more readily than dense, hard enamel.

Foods that stain include, wine (red and white) blackberries, pomegranates, cranberry juice, cola, plums, blueberries, curries, vinegars (particularly dark ones,) tomato and tomato based foods. Potentially any other dark colored food with staining powers will also leave stains on your teeth.

Indirect staining -vs- direct staining

Foods can stain teeth because of their pigment. Chemical reactions contribute to staining also. Some chemical reactions from food, softens or weakens enamel . Foods that stain teeth through some combo of deep pigments and corrosive action pose an even bigger risk.

Armor for your teeth

Not all “whitening” foods directly whiten teeth. A number of foods help whiten your smile by fortifying enamel. Enamel, the hardest substance in the human body, has a porous surface. The porous surface makes teeth vulnerable to absorbing and staining causing foods we eat.

Foods that protect enamel:

  • water
  • cheese
  • walnuts, almonds and other seeds and nuts
  • sesame oil and virgin coconut oil
  • shiitake mushrooms
  • raw onion and garlic
  • salmon
  • herbs, particularly basil

These foods neutralize plaque, neutralize corrosive foods, promote saliva or remineralize enamel.

Foods that erase stains:

  • nuts and seeds
  • celery
  • carrots
  • apples
  • broccoli
  • cauliflower
  • water
  • pineapple
  • strawberries

Fortunately all of these foods are delicious and readily available. Keep teeth white and smiles sparkling with routine brushing, flossing, and cleanings with your dentist. Add these foods in for the best defense against stains and the best offense of keeping teeth strong.

Flossing for Results

Flossing for Results

Does daily flossing effectively reduce cavities, gum disease or gingivitis?

You’re flossing. Great. Is it actually doing any good?

Amidst dozens of studies, data in favor of flossing can be hard to find, yet dentists still highly favor the practice. Careful analysis of previous studies indicate that many variables potentially influence the final result. Participants used varying methods, inconsistent technique and consistent length of flossing tended to vary a great deal.

Definitively, when trained hygienist performed flossing, outcomes were proven in several studies, demonstrating that the issues with flossing are likely due to user error and not proof that the practice has merit.

What you really need to know

How To Use Dental Floss

For dental floss to effectively remove plaque from your teeth, you need to be sure you’re using the correct technique. Because you’ll be putting your fingers into your mouth, be sure to wash your hands before you reach for the floss. Then just follow these steps:

  • Use enough floss.
    1. Break off a piece about 18 inches long.
    2. That sounds like a lot, but you want enough to keep a clean segment in place as you move from tooth to tooth.
    3. Wrap most of the floss around either the middle finger or the index finger of one hand, whichever you prefer, and a small amount onto the middle or index finger of the other hand.
    4. (Using the middle finger leaves your index finger free to manipulate the floss.)
  • Slide between teeth.
    1. Gently slide the floss between the teeth in a zigzag motion
    2. and be careful not to let the floss snap or “pop” between teeth.
  • Form a “C”.
    1. Make a C shape with the floss as you wrap it around the tooth.
    2. Then carefully pull the floss upward from the gum line to the top of the tooth.
    3. Roll along.
    4. As you move from one tooth to the next, unroll a fresh section of floss from the finger of one hand while rolling the used floss onto the finger of the other hand.
    5. Use your thumb as a guide.
  • Reach both sides.
    1. Don’t forget to floss the back side of each tooth.

As long as you use the correct technique, the type of floss you use is a matter of personal preference. There are many types to choose from, and you can even choose a variety of types to meet your needs and those of your family members. Either way, using the correct technique will help you remove the excess food particles and plaque buildup between your teeth and help improve your oral health.

Surgery Improved with Lasers

Surgery Improved with Lasers

Laser surgery in dentistry

Sci-Fi has become reality and lasers are becoming readily utilized in many different medical applications. Dentistry is no exception.  For you, the patient, this means improved healing times, increased accuracy in treated areas, and best of all, reduced pain due to procedures. For dentist it means greater precision, increased patient compliance and ultimately better over all health and better outcomes for patients.

Lasers are not new in dental medicine but their applications are continually expanding.  Lightwalker lasers, used at Dr. Marilyn K. Jones, have been leading the way in advancements for almost five decades, in precision, performance, consistency, and overall perfection.

Dentists have been using special lasers in dental treatments for 4 decades. Lasers work by delivering energy in the form of light. The light from dental lasers can be used to vaporize tissue, cut tissue, harden and enforce a bond between a filler and the remaining tooth, stop bleeding, cut away tissue or aid in whitening teeth. The precision offered with such an advanced laser is unequalled.

Why Lightwalker Lasers are Special

New innovations in surgical lasers are bringing new solutions for patients and doctors. Lasers quickly and painlessly treat a myriad of oral conditions with improved healing, improved accuracy, and less overall invasiveness. Lightwalker Fotona lasers are so accurate and reliable they can be successfully used for very delicate procedures and very specialized procedures. Used to treat some types of decay or cavities, used in gum surgery, hard and soft tissue applications, for treating gum disease and surgical, even for a nonsurgical treatment and throat anomalies — especially those related to sleep apnea. Procedures that once were invasive, with long healing times are now nominally invasive, and have a much faster healing time, with much less trauma to sensitive oral tissue.

The Benefits of our Lightwalker Fotona Dental Lasers for oral laser surgery and other procedures Include:

  • A full range of hard- and soft-tissue treatments
  • Extremely precise hard-tissue cutting and ablation
  • Easy and effective endodontic treatments
  • Little or no bleeding surgical procedures, with simultaneous disinfection
  • Easy-to-select operating modes for greater simplicity
  • Greater patient satisfaction and less operator fatigue
  • Excellent training and support for medical staff
  • Do You Need Oral Surgery or Have Sleep Apnea?

Contact our office and we can schedule you for a quick consultation to see if our surgical dental lasers can treat or help remedy your dental, oral, or sleep apnea related problems.

The Gripping Truth: Facts About Teeth Grinding

Teeth Grinding or Clenching can lead to long term health problems

Bruxism: The chronic clenching (tightly holding top and bottom teeth together) and or grinding (sliding–while clenched–back and forth) of teeth.

Occasionally or from time to time–grinding or clenching teeth–can be a normal, uneventful thing for most of people. Done on a regular or chronic basis teeth grinding and clenching will eventually be damaging to teeth, oral health, even overall health.

  • Why do people grind their teeth

The most common reasons for chronic grinding of teeth is an improper or abnormal tooth alignment, and missing or crooked teeth. In some instances Bruxism, particularly the clenching of teeth–often and long enough to cause damage–is caused by anxiety or stress.

  • How you know if you’re grinding your teeth

Typically individuals who teeth grinding are unaware of the habit because most teeth grinding occurs at night while they are asleep. Generally people learn that they grind their teeth because a family member, house-mate or loved one hears the grinding and informs them. A constant dull headache, tender jaw muscles, or sore jaw and neck muscles can be telltale of bruxism. Your dentist can help determine if you suspect bruxism by carefully inspecting the surfaces of molars and teeth for signs of scraping and excessive wear.

  • How is teeth grinding or bruxism harmful

Bruxism is a serious condition that, in addition to posing serious risks to the teeth and oral cavity, can also lead to other health conditions like TMJ, TMD even hearing loss.

The worst cases of teeth grinding, if left untreated, can loosen teeth, fracture teeth and even cause the loss of teeth. After long term grinding teeth can be worn down significantly, requiring some people to need tooth replacement or dentures. When such extensive damage occurs the jaw bone can be effected, even the contours of the face and general appearance of a person can change.

  1. Bruxism, or teeth grinding can lead to chronic pain and headaches along with damage to teeth and surrounding tissue
  2. Bruxism, or teeth grinding can lead to chronic pain and headaches along with damage to teeth and surrounding tissue
  • How to stop grinding your teeth

Many people who need to stop grinding their teeth seek their dentist for a specially made mouth guard to protect teeth, at night,from grinding.

When it has been determined that stress may be an underlying cause of bruxism, a physician may help determine options for reducing stress. Counseling, various types of therapy, and a reliable, consistent exercise program are some of the most effective an common aids in stress reduction. When needed, a patient may also employ various medications that can help with relaxing muscles and aiding in sleep.

The easiest and most common adjustments to eliminate bruxism can be done at home without anything but a few easy changes:

  1. Training yourself to relax your jaw muscle during the day. Even holding the tip of your tongue between your teeth helps to re-train jaw muscles to “unclench”.
  2. Avoid chewing gum, chewing on pens or pencils or anything except food.
    • Those habits can train jaw muscles to stay clenched and make it more likely to grind your teeth later.
  3. Cut back on caffeine, things like cola, coffee, tea and chocolate.
  4. Eliminate alcohol.
    • Consuming alcohol tends to intensify teeth grinding.

Children may grind their teeth too

While there is no clear reason why children can sometimes grind their teeth, it is somewhat common. Generally children grind their teeth at night, with increasing frequency during illnesses, or other medical conditions, (everything from nutritional deficiencies and parasites to allergies have been cited). Often the underlying cause may be irregular contact between upper and lower teeth or shifting teeth as new teeth come in or baby teeth get loose.

Baby teeth don’t typically suffer the regular problems from grinding, however children can still have jaw pain and headaches associated with bruxism. Ultimately if you suspect your child may be grinding their teeth it is definitely something to discuss with their dentist and potentially their pediatrician to evaluate any potential issues and eliminate the problem all together.