Health Secrets Starting in Your Mouth

Health Secrets Starting in Your Mouth

Health secrets that start inside your mouth

In recent years science has confirmed that even the health of our teeth and gums affect our overall health. Heart disease, diabetes, autoimmune disease, and many other disorders can all be affected by the health and wellness of teeth and gums in your mouth.

As we build healthy habits and healthy bodies, remember to be vigilant of effects on your mouth from common viruses that cause things like cold, flu and strep. Staying healthy and virus free can help keep your mouth healthier too.

Cold and flu viruses affect your oral health too

Flu and cold viruses are a part of life. We wash our hands, take vitamins, and try to stay healthy, inevitably the average adult will still get 2 to 4 colds per year. The full magnitude of the annual cold and flu season is often overlooked. However, in America, the cold virus alone, claims nearly 60 million sick days annually.

Viral infections and your oral health

  • Dry Mouth: Cold viruses, and many other viruses, dry out the oral cavity. The use of many medications that suppress runny noses and excess mucus, also contribute to drier mucus membranes. Many drugs may ultimately leave the mouth drier. Dry mouths are less slippery, allowing bacterial colonies to thrive.
  • Breathing from the mouth due to swollen, congested nasal passages also dries the oral membranes contributing further to dry mouth, and bad breath.
  • Individuals suffering from flu and cold viruses are especially prone to dehydration complicating dry mouth conditions.
  • Cough Drops and Medications: Sucking on cough drops, sipping ginger ale, even oral inhalers all adversely affect teeth and surrounding tissues.
    • Cough drops and throat lozenges, even cough syrup, are sticky and sweet. Sugar from these medications feed bacteria that cause decay and cavities.
  • Ginger ale and other fizzy drinks help with dehydration and nausea, they also create prime conditions for bacteria to thrive in.
  • Inhalers, used to help treat asthma, bronchitis, lung inflammation and COPD have medicine that dries surfaces in the mouth, creating areas ideal for bacteria to colonize.

To ward off the effects of these oral medications, rinse your mouth and brush your teeth after using them. Stay adequately hydrated.


Sleep and fatigue are culprits too

Fatigue:

  • Being over tired, lethargic and general malaise are all too common.
  • Sleeping 7 to 8 hours per night reduces inflammation and improves overall health, improving oral health and reducing gum diseasesymptoms when battling a cold or flu virus.
  • Forgo changing out of Pj’s but do not skip oral hygiene practices.
  • Viruses attack the immunes system, dampening your body’s natural ability to combat infection and inflammation.
  • Sleep deprivation is a huge contributing factor in cases of gum disease and gingivitis.
  • Don’t let being too tired influence your ability to maintain good brushing and flossing habits.

Good Oral Health Supports Good Overall Health

Recent studies support what clinicians have long suspected. Individuals who have unhealthy teeth and gums, tend to be less healthy overall. Higher rates of oral infections are linked to higher rates of bacterial pneumonia, diabetes, stroke and heart disease.

The ideal time to improve your oral health is right now, but if you are sick or feeling under the weather, don’t neglect taking care of your oral hygiene.

Call or come in and make an appointment today and we can help you get your best oral health, and your brightest smile.

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